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  #1  
Old 06-21-2018, 09:46 PM
jask jask is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Ramona, CA
Posts: 42
Default RV-7 experience

I would like to find someone close to southern Calif who would be willing to share a flying experience in a 7 for my wife. I currently have a QB 7 project that I acquired and am getting a lot of pressure to convert it to a 7A..

My wife and I decided to visit the Vans factory last week and she got a 30 minute ride in their 7A. She loved it and found out that our 7 could be converted to a 7A. The one at Vans has in fact been converted from the tailwheel version. At this point, I just have to get the other parts so it just costs more but I really hesitate to make the switch. She is a high time retired airline pilot with a lot of light airplane experience and has a very old tailwheel endorsement in a 140. Her last flight years ago in the 140 was in a significant crosswind and not a pleasant experience.
I would like to see if she still has all the evil tailwheel thoughts after actually experiencing a 7.
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  #2  
Old 06-21-2018, 11:12 PM
Robb Robb is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Nevada City Ca
Posts: 123
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Just build the 7 and get her some quality tailwheel training. Half the fun for me is landing and taking off. I would get her some time with an instructor in a tailwheel 6 or 7 just to show her its not that difficult. Just my opinion as I learned in a J3 cub and then bought a Husky and now added a 7 and love it. I spend more time in the RV than my Husky.
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  #3  
Old 06-22-2018, 03:58 AM
jask jask is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Ramona, CA
Posts: 42
Default 7 experience

It is making me feel selfish to continue the 7 build with her feeling this way. She came off the ride at Vans really enthusiastic from having a lot of fun and pleading to change it to a 7A. He did a lot of maneuvering with the plane and wrapped it up a few times with significant g's. She really liked how agile and responsive it was. She just doesn't want to deal with the tail wheel. She also doesn't want to take the time off to go back to Oregon for the transition training. Right now, my plan would be to finish the build and convert it later if she absolutely doesn't like it but that doesn't help me for the next 12 months or so. Vans will take the 7 parts back right now but I will have to buy all new conversions items later.
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  #4  
Old 06-22-2018, 06:18 AM
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olyolson olyolson is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: St Louis, MO
Posts: 738
Default RV-7A

Jim,

I think you know the answer to this riddle. "If Mama ain't happy, ain't nobody happy". Yes tail wheel flying is challenging and fun but if your wife is uncomfortable and wants a nose wheel then get her a nose wheel. You still get to fly an RV and your wife wants to enthusiastically go with you- what's not to like?

Who cares what everyone else says about having a training wheel up front? Yeah a tail wheel is cool but you're not single so a happy marriage is a happy life! Once you're airborne it still flies like an RV right?
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  #5  
Old 06-22-2018, 07:19 AM
Jim T Jim T is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Independence, OR
Posts: 200
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jask View Post
It is making me feel selfish to continue the 7 build with her feeling this way.
As it should!

Is it really that important to have a tail wheel? If so why?

Is this a one way street? Can the nose wheel be converted to a tail wheel later?

I'm willing to bet that there are a lot of men on this forum that would convert their plane to a nose wheel in a heartbeat, if it would make their wives enthusiastically support their project and happy to fly their plane.

Just food for thought.

Jim
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  #6  
Old 06-22-2018, 07:50 AM
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wirejock wirejock is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Estes Park, CO
Posts: 2,952
Default A model

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim T View Post
As it should!

Is it really that important to have a tail wheel? If so why?

Is this a one way street? Can the nose wheel be converted to a tail wheel later?

I'm willing to bet that there are a lot of men on this forum that would convert their plane to a nose wheel in a heartbeat, if it would make their wives enthusiastically support their project and happy to fly their plane.

Just food for thought.

Jim
I didn't convert. Sweetie said build any model you want as long as the wheel is in front. Happy wife. Happy Pilot
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  #7  
Old 06-22-2018, 08:21 AM
Robb Robb is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Nevada City Ca
Posts: 123
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Better keep the boss happy. If thats what she really wants it will pay off!
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  #8  
Old 06-22-2018, 10:12 AM
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Raymo Raymo is offline
 
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Location: Richmond Hill, GA (KLHW)
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The -7A is super easy to land and your insurance premium will likely be a little less expensive.
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  #9  
Old 06-22-2018, 11:08 AM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Schaumburg, IL
Posts: 3,013
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This seems like a no brainer to me. Why alienate the wife for a limited benefit. I have a 6A and have never felt like I am missing something by not having a tail dragger. Sure, there is a cool factor and the challenge of mastering it, but on the flip side, there is comfort for both of you in handling tougher wind conditions, increasing the utility of the plane.

It just doesn't seem like the benefits outweigh the cons in this case. As you know, people are hesitant to change their feelings and your wife is not likely to overcome her discomfort even if she does adapt to it. You don't want her to become one of those people that will only fly when the winds are under 10 knots. Also, guess who gets blamed if she does ground loop it.

Larry
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Last edited by lr172 : 06-22-2018 at 11:12 AM.
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  #10  
Old 06-23-2018, 09:27 AM
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Snowflake Snowflake is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Posts: 3,177
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Maybe show her the video of the -7A collapsing its nosewheel and going on its back in the UK.

Really, the RV is one of the easier tailwheel airplanes to fly... It's much easier than the 140 to handle, IMO.
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