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Old 08-26-2017, 06:40 AM
WingedFrog's Avatar
WingedFrog WingedFrog is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Originally Posted by DaveWelch View Post
My understanding has been that, although perhaps counterintuitive, the best strategy is to try to get the prop stopped (stalled) if you have a dead engine. Reason is that it takes energy to keep it turning (think of the effort needed to start by hand propping). That energy is coming from the air against the prop (drag) and is stealing your airspeed and altitude at the worst possible time while you're trying to get max glide. Seems like I recall at least one POH that said if no luck restarting, then pull up to slow down in an attempt to let the prop stop. Kind of a twofer, you (might) gain some altitude (don't stall!) and get a better glide after it stops.
Excellent point, Dave and convincing argument. I just wonder if I would think of it in the quite stressing situation of engine loss? Well, I am not too much concerned, I am flying behind a Rotax 912, not a Lycoming or Continental engine!
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Builder's name: Jean-Pierre Bernoux
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Kit # 120395 N124BX
Flying as of 9/11/2013

Builder's Blog:http://vieilleburette.blogspot.com/
EAA 1114
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