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  #1  
Old 06-16-2018, 05:58 PM
ianneub ianneub is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Snohomish WA
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Default Maximum Wind Limitation

Hi All,

I recently purchased an RV-12 and have been having a great time getting to know the plane and flying as much as possible.

I've looked around in this forum, but I haven't seen anyone discuss this figure I saw in the POH:

Quote:
Maximum Wind Limitation 30kt
Does this limitation apply in all situations? Or only for take off / landing?

I've flown in some winds now that showed 20kt+ according to the D180 calculation.

With the lightness of this airplane, I'm worried that a wind gust might hit and flip the plane over. On the ground 30kt is well past my personal limitation. So I shouldn't be in that situation. But what about in the air, at altitude?

Do other RV-12 pilots worry about that?

Thanks in advance for your input!
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  #2  
Old 06-16-2018, 06:11 PM
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Piper J3 Piper J3 is offline
 
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To answer your question… once an airplane is flying It doesn’t care about wind direction or speed - turbulence becomes the deciding factor. The airplane simply flies within the moving air mass. Groundspeed is directly affected by both wind direction and speed. Wind becomes a factor, as you point out, during ground operations and when the plane transitions to/from the hard surface.
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  #3  
Old 06-16-2018, 06:44 PM
DHeal DHeal is offline
 
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The strength and direction of winds aloft are also important when flying in mountainous areas. Maintaining an appropriate altitude above ridge lines during high wind conditions is prudent. The low wing loading of the typical LSA usually means that you will be more susceptible to the effects of turbulence and varying air currents than heavier, high wing loading aircraft. The modest performance that is typical of most LSAs at higher altitudes requires a very good understanding of mountain flying techniques.
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  #4  
Old 06-16-2018, 08:59 PM
Mich48041 Mich48041 is offline
 
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I once climbed up very high crossing water to be within gliding distance of shore. There was a 50 knot cross wind according to the D-180. My RV-12 flew just fine. It thought the air was calm. But it took forever to cross the water.
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  #5  
Old 06-17-2018, 05:09 AM
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tomkk tomkk is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piper J3 View Post
To answer your question… once an airplane is flying It doesn’t care about wind direction or speed - turbulence becomes the deciding factor. The airplane simply flies within the moving air mass. Groundspeed is directly affected by both wind direction and speed. Wind becomes a factor, as you point out, during ground operations and when the plane transitions to/from the hard surface.
Couldn't agree more. I wonder why Vans put the 30 knot limitation in the POH?
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  #6  
Old 06-17-2018, 07:31 AM
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Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomkk View Post
Couldn't agree more. I wonder why Vans put the 30 knot limitation in the POH?
Maybe due to turbulence below 1000' AGL that 30 kts of wind could generate?
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  #7  
Old 06-17-2018, 07:49 AM
rocketman1988 rocketman1988 is offline
 
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Default interesting

Call van's and ask them...as has been previously posted, once airborne, the airplane moves within the airmass and the wind makes no difference...
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Old 06-17-2018, 09:21 AM
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DaleB DaleB is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketman1988 View Post
Call van's and ask them...as has been previously posted, once airborne, the airplane moves within the airmass and the wind makes no difference...
I can't imagine that any wind limitation doesn't just refer to surface winds only. It's not unusual at all to see 40 to 50+ knot winds aloft around here, even at relatively low altitudes. I have a screenshot from a friend who borrowed the plane showing 201 MPH ground speed on the way to FL - that's a 63 knot tailwind.
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  #9  
Old 06-17-2018, 10:41 PM
ianneub ianneub is offline
 
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Location: Snohomish WA
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Smile

Thank you all for the great comments!
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  #10  
Old 06-18-2018, 03:10 PM
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JonJay JonJay is offline
 
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It is really embarrassing to have to call the tower, shut down, get out, and push your airplane around because you didn’t have the power to turn it out of the wind. It is equally embarrassing to have to call the tower, shut down, and beg for help to get a few guys to “walk” your airplane off the taxiway.
30kts is a lot of wind on the ground to try to safely taxi any RV.
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