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  #1  
Old 08-09-2018, 09:31 AM
rjkulesa@gmail.com rjkulesa@gmail.com is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: NJ
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Default Goofed Nose Rib - Next steps?

Section 8 (Horizontal Stabilizer) Page 08-11, Step 3.

Hi All,
I reached out to the mothership a few days ago, and while awaiting a response, I'm very interested in what you all think.

Iíve riveted the middle four HS-905 nose-ribs to the right and left skin.
On the last of the four ribs, the last rivet, I didnít like the flushness of the manufactured head so I drilled out the rivet.
The head snapped clean off and when I used the punch on the rivet body, it bent out the flange on the nose rib a bit.

I tried using gorilla tape to hold the flange to the skin when re-riveting, but not with much luck; it sticks out. When I re-rivited, it bulged between the two parts.

What should I do about that last rivet? The only thought I had is to drill out the entire rib and replace with a new rib, but Iím quite concerned about ruining the entire skin by having to perform so many drill outs. And then making a small problem a really big, painful, expensive problem.

Picture below:



Thanks in advance.
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  #2  
Old 08-09-2018, 09:36 AM
RV7AJeremy's Avatar
RV7AJeremy RV7AJeremy is offline
 
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Drill out the bad river again. Mix up some proseal, inject it between the two parts. Insert cleco to pull the parts together and let it cure. Then in a few days rivet it together.
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  #3  
Old 08-09-2018, 09:56 AM
Tom Martin Tom Martin is offline
 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
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Cut off the little flange, looks to be an inch and a bit long. Take a piece of aluminum angle, the same gauge, and use as a replacement. Drill hole in skin first to the flange and clecoe in place, now drill one or preferably two holes in the other flange to the rib. Remove, clean, dimple small flange hole. Rivet flange to skin, then rivet angle of flange to rib.
This took longer to type then the job will take!

There are of course many variations of this idea.
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  #4  
Old 08-09-2018, 09:57 AM
Tom Martin Tom Martin is offline
 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
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Cut off the little flange, looks to be an inch and a bit long. Take a piece of aluminum angle, the same gauge, and use as a replacement. Drill hole in skin first to the flange and clecoe in place, now drill one or preferably two holes in the other flange to the rib. Remove, clean, dimple small flange hole. Rivet flange to skin, then rivet angle of flange to rib.
This took longer to type then the job will take!

There are of course many variations of this idea.
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Tom Martin RV1 pilot 4.6hours!
CPL & IFR rated
EVO F1 Rocket 1000 hours,
2010 SARL Rocket 100 race, average speed of 238.6 knots/274.6mph
RV4, RV7, RV10, two HRIIs and five F1 Rockets
RV14 Tail dragger flying #153

Fairlea Field
St.Thomas, Ontario Canada, CYQS
fairleafield@gmail.com
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  #5  
Old 08-09-2018, 10:18 AM
mountainride mountainride is offline
 
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You should be able to squeeze that rivet. For these try taking a piece of small flexible tubing just bigger than the diameter of the rivet and slightly longer. When you squeeze the shop head the tubing will make sure the two pieces of material are held together as the rivet is set.
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  #6  
Old 08-09-2018, 10:28 AM
rjkulesa@gmail.com rjkulesa@gmail.com is offline
 
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Love these ideas! I don't have any proseal (yet), can I use something else I can find locally just to pull the two pieces together like a silicone or glue for such a small amount before re-riveting? (I remember reading somewhere to only use a certain type of silicone that doesn't react to aluminum).

Maybe use that 3M VHB tape used on the rudder trailing edge?...

The part that is deceiving is this rib is in the middle lower section of the skin...so not reachable by squeezer at all.
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  #7  
Old 08-09-2018, 10:35 AM
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RV-14E RV-14E is offline
 
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That's an excellent example of a place not to use a punch to get the shop head out, since it will just push and bend the flange out, as you experienced. Using a punch is more appropriate when access to the shop head prevents the method illustrated below from being used. It should be very carefully applied with something supporting the piece on the back side, like a bucking bar with hole drilled in to accommodate the shop head. That would mitigate the piece from bending out and helps transfer the full force of the punch to the rivet head rather than the material around it.

Page 05-04, Figure 3 illustrates a great method for shop head removal...



So, with nine rivets holding that rib in right now, you can consider drilling them out (using flush cutters on shop heads), and replace the rib or bend the flange back (after inspecting that there are not cracks from bending), according to your preference.
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Last edited by RV-14E : 08-09-2018 at 10:51 AM.
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  #8  
Old 08-09-2018, 10:56 AM
mturnerb mturnerb is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RV-14E View Post
That's an excellent example of a place not to use a punch to get the shop head out, since it will just push and bend the flange out, as you experienced. Using a punch is more appropriate when access to the shop head prevents the method illustrated below from being used. It should be very carefully applied with something supporting the piece on the back side, like a bucking bar with hole drilled in to accommodate the shop head. That would mitigate the piece from bending out and helps transfer the full force of the punch to the rivet head rather than the material around it.

Page 05-04, Figure 3 illustrates a great method for shop head removal...



So, with nine rivets holding that rib in right now, you can consider drilling them out (using flush cutters on shop heads), and replace the rib or bend the flange back (after inspecting that there are not cracks from bending), according to your preference.
Another technique is to stabilize the part with the shop head against the other structure using a bucking bar held just next to the shop head and pop the drilled remnant of the manufactured head with a spring-loaded center punch. I second the use of a piece of tubing (I use aquarium style clear tubing cut to a short length) over the rivet to push the pieces together. May not work well in this instance however - the other methods mentioned may work better.
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  #9  
Old 08-09-2018, 12:20 PM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
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Before doing any of that stuff, reach in with something like a wooden stick and bend the web flat. That by itself might get the flange a lot closer to the skin.

You might need to put a slot in a second stick to simultaneously pull another part of the end of the web from the other side. Maybe not.

A short piece of rubber tube (rubber fuel line works well) on the end of the rivet helps keep the flange pressed against the skin while riveting.

Dave
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  #10  
Old 08-09-2018, 01:12 PM
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az_gila az_gila is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Martin View Post
Cut off the little flange, looks to be an inch and a bit long. Take a piece of aluminum angle, the same gauge, and use as a replacement. Drill hole in skin first to the flange and clecoe in place, now drill one or preferably two holes in the other flange to the rib. Remove, clean, dimple small flange hole. Rivet flange to skin, then rivet angle of flange to rib.
This took longer to type then the job will take!

There are of course many variations of this idea.
Do this, but make the tab longer on the rib side, almost to the other skin.

It looks like you may have creased the nose portion of the rib slightly when the flange bit got bent.

Straighten it out and make the added tab reinforce that area. As stated above, 2 rivets should do it, and going one thickness larger in the new tab would help.
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