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  #21  
Old 02-23-2013, 11:41 AM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaleB View Post
Hmmm.

I give it one good solid whack and the dimples appear to be fully formed, well defined, and with a distinct ring around them just like if I'd done them with a squeezer.
Clarification...
The tip to look for the concentric ring around the dimple as proof of it fully formed, is not complete evidence that the dimple is fully formed.

When the dimple is almost but not quite fully formed, the skin will be in contact with the outer perimeter edge of the male die and it will leave a scuffed ring, but the entire flat face of the die will still not have contacted the skin. This contact is what finishes the dimple properly and returns the skin to being completely flat.
So, what you actually need to look for is the concentric ring, with uniform skin surface scuffing on the entire area within the ring.

If you are a builder that is using a single layer of masking tape on the male die so that you do not leave the scuff mark on the skin (because you are crazy enough that you plan to leave the airplane bare polished later), then you need to just learn to read the reflection of the skin (which I think is the most reliable technique anyway).
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  #22  
Old 02-24-2013, 11:58 AM
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wyoflyer wyoflyer is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 57
Default one more suggestion

Haven't seen it mentioned yet, but one way to fix slightly dimpled skin on the visible side is to get a hardwood dowel or steel rod approx. 1/2" diameter and if you can get access to the back side, place the dowel or rod onto the bucked rivet. Just a light tap, will take the dimple out. Very effective and can improve the appearance of the skin.
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  #23  
Old 02-24-2013, 05:30 PM
Rick S. Rick S. is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 735
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Looks like a classic flange not 90 degrees to the rib web. Keep your pressures below 40 psi at the rivet gun as well. Plus the prior posts have good info as well but many overlook the flange alignment.
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  #24  
Old 02-25-2013, 08:02 AM
chaskuss chaskuss is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: SE Florida
Posts: 1,270
Default Back riveting gives better cosmetic results

Mike,
Check for under dimpling as mentioned by previous replies. That said, I suspect that this is simply caused by the thinner skin bending to meet the shape of the thicker rib below it. The rib flange tends to be wavy, due to fluting. The action of the rivet gun pushes the skin into the rib flange. With conventional riveting techniques, the thinner material tends to form to the thicker part's shape.
If you are looking to obtain dead flat skins, forget conventional riveting. Back rivet. That way, the gun and the shop head tend to bend the rib flange flat to conform to the the skin/bucking bar combination.
Charlie
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  #25  
Old 02-25-2013, 08:18 AM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
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Originally Posted by chaskuss View Post
Mike,
Check for under dimpling as mentioned by previous replies. That said, I suspect that this is simply caused by the thinner skin bending to meet the shape of the thicker rib below it. The rib flange tends to be wavy, due to fluting. The action of the rivet gun pushes the skin into the rib flange. With conventional riveting techniques, the thinner material tends to form to the thicker part's shape.
If you are looking to obtain dead flat skins, forget conventional riveting. Back rivet. That way, the gun and the shop head tend to bend the rib flange flat to conform to the the skin/bucking bar combination.
Charlie
Charlie,

In this instance, the skin is thicker than the rib so I don't think this is an issue, though I agree that backriveting (when done correctly) gives a flatter finish.

I can clearly tell from the photos that the first problem (there may be riveting technique issues also) that needs to be resolved is the skin dimpling... you can't get a flat looking finish if you are using skins that aren't flat to start with.
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  #26  
Old 02-25-2013, 09:18 AM
aerhed aerhed is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Big Sandy, WY
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Scott, what type of machine are the QB's dimpled with? I know it can't be a bunch of fillipinos playing whack-a-mole.
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  #27  
Old 02-25-2013, 10:24 AM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
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Location: Hubbard Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aerhed View Post
Scott, what type of machine are the QB's dimpled with? I know it can't be a bunch of fillipinos playing whack-a-mole.
I don't know how they do it now, but when I was there many years ago, they had a bunch of tables with C-frame tools.
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