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  #1  
Old 09-12-2018, 04:49 PM
dbs dbs is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: BC
Posts: 3
Default RV14 emp ordered. Now what?

My RV14 emp will be shipped in a couple of weeks. I have acquired 99% of the tools. Its the primer I'm still pondering. I do want to prime. Its between rattle cans or Stewarts system as I want to paint during our somewhat cold winters here in Canada in my heated garage. What is the consensus on Stewarts (which one) whether its as good as the more toxic epoxy stuff. Is there a difference in the color?
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  #2  
Old 09-12-2018, 04:55 PM
AusFlyingBear AusFlyingBear is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Temporary - Christchurch New Zealand
Posts: 38
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I've used the Stewarts EkoPrime Primer/Sealer smoke grey. Very easy to work with an clean up. As for colour I can't compare sorry but I'm happy with the smoke grey.

I would highly recommend the Stewarts Systems paints and primers.
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  #3  
Old 09-12-2018, 07:32 PM
terrye terrye is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
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Default RV14 emp ordered. Now what?

I decided I was going to primer my RV-9A because I wasn't sure if I was ever going to be able to afford a hangar and the finished airplane might have to live outside near the coast. I decided if I was going to go to that trouble, I might as well go with the best primer I could find which turned out to be Super Koropon epoxy primer. This needs Alumiprep and Alodine preparation. This primer is "fluid resistant" (Skydrol, avgas, oil etc.) and I'm glad I used it and would probably use it again. I was able to paint outside almost all of the time (especially for wing skins) if I picked my days. I also built a small spray booth inside which used a furnace blower to exhaust outside my shop.

Most of the effort in primer painting was in the surface preparation and after painting cleanup. In my view, if you are really concerned about internal corrosion, then "rattle can" primer will give an illusion of protection rather than real protection. Don't know about Stewart Systems. It's a lot of work to properly primer the interior surfaces (that is, to make sure the primer really adheres to the surface), so I'd encourage you to do a little more research. What are your reasons for priming, and then select a primer to do that job. Talk to the paint manufacturers as well as posting on this forum.
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  #4  
Old 09-13-2018, 08:45 AM
iwannarv iwannarv is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Stafford, KS
Posts: 288
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I went with Akzo Nobel Epoxy primer. I have been happy with it.

Next time, I will probably try to select something a little more friendly (to my workspace and health). I have talked with Stewart on their Eco products. I will probably go that route then.
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  #5  
Old 09-13-2018, 09:56 AM
mturnerb mturnerb is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Ponte Vedra, FL
Posts: 742
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A reasonably safe/less messy option is to brush or roll on the Sherwin Williams "wash primer" that Van's uses in the quickbuilds (P60G2 I think). Not the route I chose but it's been tested in the pacific northwest with good results (coated pieces left outdoors at the mothership in Oregon).

I've been happy with my choice of SEM rattle-can self etching primer. Not cheap but easy to apply to each part and a very quick way to prep a part same day of install. (best price I've found is at Summit Racing but no idea if they'll ship to BC)
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  #6  
Old 09-13-2018, 12:03 PM
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BrianDC BrianDC is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Northern VA
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As others have said, there is no "right" answer and something you will have to decided on yourself. Lots of opinions on this board.
I think there is enough evidence that it's not required but may be beneficial depending on where you plan on flying / keeping your aircraft eventually.

I like the look and scratch resistance of the AKZO primer and have been using it on my project. Others have been using some of the rattle can products.

Look at a few of the build logs of others and what you think you want to do. Primer does add weight and will impact how long it takes for you to build (surface prep / etc). It also requires you to have the right safety gear.

Congrats on your purchase and welcome to VAF. Just don't spend too much time on these never-ending debates!
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  #7  
Old 09-13-2018, 12:35 PM
dbs dbs is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: BC
Posts: 3
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Thanks guys for the input on priming. Still, I'm no further ahead on a decision. I may just order a can of Stewart's system and compare with a rattle can. I have access to some professional aircraft maintenance people who work on airliners. May seek their opinion. My own experience is moving my old 30 year old piper 180 from Regina Sask. to Boca Raton FL and watching the interior skin get a "whitish" coating on it within a year of leaving it on the ramp in Pompano.
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  #8  
Old 09-13-2018, 05:52 PM
Tom Martin Tom Martin is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ontario, Canada
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I do not always prime but for where you live it would likely be a good idea.
Forget the rattle cans. If you are going to prime do it right. I have found that 100LL fuel will often easily remove spray bomb primer.
Find out who is considered the "best" car painter in your area and then find out who supplies their paint. That supplier will likely have all the information that you need to properly prime aircraft aluminum. Sometimes it is not easy, and never cheap, to get paint products shipped in from the States.
Take the time to properly apply the primer. A bad job with rattle cans is much worse then doing nothing.
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  #9  
Old 09-13-2018, 09:18 PM
mturnerb mturnerb is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Ponte Vedra, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Martin View Post
I do not always prime but for where you live it would likely be a good idea.
Forget the rattle cans. If you are going to prime do it right. I have found that 100LL fuel will often easily remove spray bomb primer.
Find out who is considered the "best" car painter in your area and then find out who supplies their paint. That supplier will likely have all the information that you need to properly prime aircraft aluminum. Sometimes it is not easy, and never cheap, to get paint products shipped in from the States.
Take the time to properly apply the primer. A bad job with rattle cans is much worse then doing nothing.
What's the evidence that a "bad job with rattle cans is much worse than doing nothing"? How do you define a bad job? I did due diligence and chose this route and have found the primer to be reasonably resilient over 2 years of building.
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  #10  
Old 09-13-2018, 09:43 PM
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Brantel Brantel is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Newport, TN
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I used 3 different priming methods on my RV-7. I used Marhyde Self Etching for the emp kit, Stewart's waterborne Eko-Primer/Sealer on the wings and much of the fuse. Rattle can self etching primer for the small stuff and some of the final skins to go on at the hangar.

The one with the least performance over time has been the Marhyde. It was easy to scratch and had adhesion problems.

Next would be the dupli-color rattle can self etching primer. It has OK durability that increases with age. It sticks well to most stuff but won't take dimpling or any thing like that after priming.

The best for the RV-7 was the Stewart Eko-Primer/Sealer. It did require, etching/scrubbing and had a learning curve to understand how to spray it. It also takes a long time to dry and is easy to damage until it does. Once it dries it sticks well as long as the prep work was done properly. It is also non-hazardous which is a plus!

Fast forward to my new RV-10 build and I am going with AKZO. So far this stuff is amazing! It does require proper prep but is super easy to spray. I am doing the scrub with BonAmi and scotchbrite, rinse and prime method. It cures fast and is tough as nails!
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