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  #11  
Old 06-09-2017, 01:30 AM
Turbo69bird Turbo69bird is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: CT
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I should also include that it's typically only no 1 that is that hot the rest are usually 20 degrees cooler.

My concern was the rpm being so low as others have told me that was incorrect and pitch change was in Order.

My typical rollout is nose wheel high asap, 15 * flaps, lift off pitch for 80 as soon as I clear obstacles ( usually not by much maybe 40 ft on a 2100 ft runway with 20 ft trees immediately and 50 ft a little farther out) I'll pitch for 100 if possible climb to 1000 pull power back some and use enrgy to reach TPA of 1200. Then level out to 120 and start cooling things down.

Occasionally at full throttle in cruise I'll see higher CHT temps than I'd like but typically stays pretty cool in cruise.

This past night I had all wheel pants off for repair work so that could have been a contributor because it was worse than normal.
Over all though doesn't sound like I'm that far off from others which makes me feel a little better.

No one sells a hotter cam for these babies to wake them up huh? Could use a little more HP 😀 How about ported heads ? Actually I've been told push rod length could make some difference?

I feel like my baffling is pretty good and none of the RV guys local seem to think it's got issues w baffling
I did just shimm the mounts for better alingmeng with the cowl which I felt would help my cooling as well because the baffling is getting closer to the cowl for better sealing?


Thank you to all who have replied btw.. I very much appreciate the help.
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  #12  
Old 06-09-2017, 06:48 AM
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titanhank titanhank is offline
 
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Location: Friendswood, Tx
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If it just one cylinder gets hot, check the cht probe itself. I had one reading 50degs hot several years ago on a two stroke engine. Pull the probe out and put in a coffee can of water. Heat the can with a propane torch till boiling. You gauge should read 212degs +- 5 degs if everything is working correctly. The temp your gauge reads can be effected by the many things.

10-1 compression pistons, dual pmags and a little polishing of the ports will get you 180hp out of the 0-320. That is my plan after the panel upgrade.
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Last edited by titanhank : 06-09-2017 at 06:50 AM.
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  #13  
Old 06-09-2017, 08:40 AM
Kyle Boatright Kyle Boatright is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbo69bird View Post
110 to 120 is a pretty shallow climb out and with noise abatement procedures in effect I don't know that that sallow of a climb out would be appreciated in my area to pattern altitude.

at a 90 mph climb I'm at the end of x wind by the time I reach pattern altitude.
With a FP prop, you'll get about the same climb rate at 110 knots as 90 mph. At 110 knots I see roughly 1,000 fpm.
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  #14  
Old 06-09-2017, 09:32 AM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbo69bird View Post

I feel like my baffling is pretty good and none of the RV guys local seem to think it's got issues w baffling
3 out of 4 RV's I have ever looked at / inspected had something that could be improved on the baffles. The majority of the time when it was on an airplane with cooling problems there was a serious issue.

My point being that this mean 3 out of 4 RV owners that you get advice from will say that it is fine...... but it might not be.

Don't take anyone word for it. Do a light test.
With the hangar dark, shine a light from the upper side of the baffling to the lower side.
A good baffle installation will be one that light passes only in areas that it is passing cooling fins.
Then evaluate the baffle seals. Particularly at the front.

A total leakage area of just a couple of square inches can have a significant impact.
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  #15  
Old 06-10-2017, 08:56 PM
Turbo69bird Turbo69bird is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rvbuilder2002 View Post
3 out of 4 RV's I have ever looked at / inspected had something that could be improved on the baffles. The majority of the time when it was on an airplane with cooling problems there was a serious issue.

My point being that this mean 3 out of 4 RV owners that you get advice from will say that it is fine...... but it might not be.

Don't take anyone word for it. Do a light test.
With the hangar dark, shine a light from the upper side of the baffling to the lower side.
A good baffle installation will be one that light passes only in areas that it is passing cooling fins.
Then evaluate the baffle seals. Particularly at the front.

A total leakage area of just a couple of square inches can have a significant impact.
I'll try the light test and see what I get, I don't have a hangar so I'll have to wait til I can borrow one for a little while.
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  #16  
Old 06-10-2017, 09:02 PM
Turbo69bird Turbo69bird is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Boatright View Post
With a FP prop, you'll get about the same climb rate at 110 knots as 90 mph. At 110 knots I see roughly 1,000 fpm.
As it is I rotate get about 10 ft up and level out as long as I can to get the speed up before climbing out. I'm Not going to reach 100mph most times before the end of the runway / trees, never mind 110 knots and to stay in the pattern (and climb like I do in the 180 archer)I'd only degrade the speed not pick up speed.or I'd be on downwind by the time I reached that speed and pattern altitude ) If I was climbing straight out maybe, but as I said it'd be a very shallow climb out til I reached those speeds.
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Special Thanks to Fred Stucklen


While I'm not a builder if I happen to give advice , I will not be responsible for damage to equipment, your ego, parts, world wide power outages, spontaneously generated black holes, planetary disruptions, or personal injury that may result from the use of this advice.
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  #17  
Old 06-10-2017, 09:14 PM
Kyle Boatright Kyle Boatright is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbo69bird View Post
As it is I rotate get about 10 ft up and level out as long as I can to get the speed up before climbing out. I'm Not going to reach 100mph most times before the end of the runway / trees, never mind 110 knots and to stay in the pattern (and climb like I do in the 180 archer)I'd only degrade the speed not pick up speed.or I'd be on downwind by the time I reached that speed and pattern altitude ) If I was climbing straight out maybe, but as I said it'd be a very shallow climb out til I reached those speeds.
The idea is to climb at VX until you clear the obstacles, then VY or higher (say 110 knots) afterwards for cooling.
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  #18  
Old 06-10-2017, 09:50 PM
DavidAhrens DavidAhrens is offline
 
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Location: Bakersfield, CA
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Default RV6A performance

Hi Turbo69bird, RV's with lower HP engines are sensitive to weight. Sounds like you are over Van's recommended Gross weight as loaded. I do notice the difference with another person and full tanks over just me (180 pounds)and low tanks. Numbers for my plane are 1050 Emtpy weight. Stock O-320 engine with Sensenich 79 inch pitch Propeller. Full throttle static RPM is about 2250. Top speed is 190mph at 2600rpm down low (1500Feet). Prop can be oversped at almost any altitude. This rpm (2250) will not increase after takeoff until you lower the nose but the plane should continue to accelerate. Look up Vans numbers for Climb and speed numbers, you should be close.
Daverv6A
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  #19  
Old 06-11-2017, 08:28 AM
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Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbo69bird View Post
As it is I rotate get about 10 ft up and level out as long as I can to get the speed up before climbing out.
Intuitively this sounds like a good idea but it isn't good technique with your plane and won't produce max climb performance.

Initial climb immediately after liftoff should be 85-90 kts, then when well clear of obstacles allow the plane to accelerate to ~115 kts while continuing the climb. This will result in good climb performance and keep the engine cool.

My plane is a RV-6, O-320, Sens 80". Loading the plane with passenger and fuel results is a very different flight from solo but the same climb technique should be used.
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  #20  
Old 06-11-2017, 07:29 PM
terrykohler terrykohler is offline
 
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Default A Few Comments on Technique and Equipment

Ten to fifteen degrees of flaps will help you get "unstuck" faster and so will raising the nose as soon as you're able. However, raising it more than a couple of inches above the grass will detract from your performance. Also, 10 feet is far too high to take advantage of ground effect. I don't have a "6", but the speeds you're using don't sound appropriate for Vx and Vy. Too slow also detracts from performance. Your aircraft with an O320 and FP prop should out-perform a Cherokee 180.
Finally, you might also check your tire pressure (45-50 psi) and the ground clearance of your gear fairings.
Terry, CFI
RV9A N323TP
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