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  #1  
Old 04-07-2017, 06:17 AM
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Auburntsts Auburntsts is offline
 
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Default O2 Cylinder Size

So I'm thinking about adding a 4-place O2 system, but I'm kind of stymied as to what size cylinder to get. For those of you that travel a lot, how often are you going up into the mid-teens at cruise? Currently I cruise between 8K and 10K so don't have a clue if climbing higher is something that would become routine or just be an occasional thing.
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  #2  
Old 04-07-2017, 06:50 AM
cderk cderk is offline
 
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I'd be interested in knowing this as well. I guess there would be two reasons for me to get up to the mid teens - performance increases (taking advantages of winds, etc) and then I would imagine it would also allow you to get above most weather. Still have a long build ahead of me, but I'm looking forward to getting this puppy in the air.
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  #3  
Old 04-07-2017, 07:08 AM
pa38112 pa38112 is offline
 
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It is so dependent on weather that it is imposable to summarize. I could go a year without hitting the teens, and then do it every flight for 2 months. Regardless, you will want the O2 for when you need it. I have a D size, and it is great for my 2 place. That would mean an "E" for a 4 place - if you really expect to have 4 often.
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  #4  
Old 04-07-2017, 07:22 AM
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Auburntsts Auburntsts is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pa38112 View Post
It is so dependent on weather that it is imposable to summarize. I could go a year without hitting the teens, and then do it every flight for 2 months. Regardless, you will want the O2 for when you need it. I have a D size, and it is great for my 2 place. That would mean an "E" for a 4 place - if you really expect to have 4 often.
Thanks! The E size (682L) was what I'm leaning towards under the "I'd rather have too much than not enough" theory. Plus I'd like to have as much time between refills as possible, mainly because I'm a lazy bast*rd.
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  #5  
Old 04-07-2017, 07:32 AM
mturnerb mturnerb is online now
 
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Another reason to go bigger is that refill costs are not incrementally economical if you refill at an FBO - it's less expensive to fill a large cylinder occasionally than a smaller one more frequently.
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  #6  
Old 04-07-2017, 07:42 AM
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Carl Froehlich Carl Froehlich is offline
 
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I have the Mountain High system with the AL-682 cylinder. The pouch that comes with the cylinder straps to the top of the tunnel cover just behind the front seats. This makes it easy to snap in or out for refill, and for reaching back to turn on the valve.

We did a couple of long trips out west from Virginia with a lot of time at 14K' and 15K', two people. We used less than half a bottle for the round trip. I use O2 anytime over 8K'. There are three of us that share a charging station, each getting a O2 bottle from the local supply house ($40 for a full bottle). Three bottles provide a lot of charges for the AL-682.

Carl
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  #7  
Old 04-07-2017, 08:20 AM
RV7ator RV7ator is offline
 
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Get the biggest tank you can cram in AND Mountain High's O2D2 proportionator.

I have the 647 tank in our -7 and my wife and I can cruise around the US without a refill. The O2D2 is the secret, effectively tripling the tank size. Pricey but worth it. We can suck a tank dry in 10 hours on oxymizer canulas. YMMV, your duration at what altitude defining your range. It's a huge and expensive inconvenience to find an FBO pumping O2.

Choose your altitude according to all the reasons we learned in ground school. No opinion on your operations.

John Siebold
Boise (MSA 12,000)

Last edited by RV7ator : 04-07-2017 at 08:23 AM.
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  #8  
Old 04-07-2017, 08:37 AM
crabandy crabandy is offline
 
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I have the Mountain High AL-647 and the O2D2-2G for my RV7, I usually set it for O2 above 050 if I'm planning on flying above 080. The O2 seems to help with fatigue/feeling fresher upon arrival as well as longer intervals between bathroom breaks. So far I haven't come close to emptying the cylinder on trips of 12-15 hours.

For a little money up front you can fill your own bottle at home for a few bucks, on the road the facilities that can fill a bottle usually have expensive fuel and more hassle/traffic in and out not to mention the fill price.

The O2 is helpful for turning a headwind into a tailwind and getting above the bumps/clouds/terrain. It opens up more options when traveling cross country. Since I bought my system I've used it approximately 50% of the time.
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  #9  
Old 04-07-2017, 08:42 AM
GTWreck GTWreck is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RV7ator View Post
Get the biggest tank you can cram in AND Mountain High's O2D2 proportionator.

I have the 647 tank in our -7 and my wife and I can cruise around the US without a refill. The O2D2 is the secret, effectively tripling the tank size. Pricey but worth it. We can suck a tank dry in 10 hours on oxymizer canulas. YMMV, your duration at what altitude defining your range. It's a huge and expensive inconvenience to find an FBO pumping O2.
I came here to say exactly this. I have the O2D2 and a CFFC-022 (carbon fiber, 22cu ft) cylinder. Anytime I go above 8k on any trip over an hour, I usually have it on. I got the four port regulator, so I can run an O2D2 for the front seats and another one for the back seats. I nestle the tank (in its bag) in between the two rear seats. It's close enough for me to reach back to turn it on and hook it all up while in flight.

Lots of advantages for this setup:
1. It's about 1/3 the cost of a built-in system.
2. The CF tank is feather light.
3. I fill that tank about 2-3 times a year. I built my own refilling rig so the refill cost is next to zero. I've yet to need to refill while away from home.
4. It's removable from the plane.
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  #10  
Old 04-07-2017, 08:47 AM
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Auburntsts Auburntsts is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GTWreck View Post
I got the four port regulator, so I can run an O2D2 for the front seats and another one for the back seats.
Aaron,
Do you have two O2D2 systems (one for front and back) or are you running one O2D2 up front and constant flow breathing stations in the back?
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