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  #11  
Old 08-08-2016, 10:21 AM
Fearless's Avatar
Fearless Fearless is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Crestwood, KY
Posts: 785
Default Tungsten bar?

Make sure you have a tungsten bucking bar in your tool arsenal. Makes setting rivets so much better. Your shop is coming along nicely.
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RV-9A Based K6I2
Transition Training Completed (6A)
Building RV-12 with brother
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  #12  
Old 08-08-2016, 07:49 PM
dwranda dwranda is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Jamestown,NY
Posts: 148
Default

You should be just in time for 2019...[/quote]
If I may ask, is there something happening in 2019 that I need to make sure my plane is done for? That would be a good goal!!
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  #13  
Old 08-10-2016, 04:32 PM
PilotjohnS PilotjohnS is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 235
Default 2019

I think 2019 refers to the next Rosie Grand Tour.

Thanks all for the advice. This site is wonderful and I think that this is the most important tool.
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John S

WARNING! Information presented in this post is my opinion. All users of info have sole responsibility for determining accuracy or suitability for thier use.

Extra dues paid 2017, worth every penny

RV9A- Status: tail feathers done less tips
Wings 50%
www.pilotjohnsrv9.blogspot.com
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  #14  
Old 08-26-2016, 09:55 PM
PilotjohnS PilotjohnS is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 235
Default Progress

So I am making progress on the sample wing section practice kit from Vans. This practice kit uses all the tools so is very helpful in getting to know my way around cleco pliers and such.

A word about reamers and drill bits; the holes in the parts are prepunched on a very precise CNC machine so everything lines up. If things don't line up, something is wrong. I found the clecos from Brown Tools are professional grade and line up the holes precisely. The prepunched holes are slightly undersized and need to be enlarged to final size. This can be done with a standard drill bit or a reamer bit. The reamer looks like a drill bit but the flutes are straight up and down. I use the reamer just like a drill bit and enlarge the holes to final size. The reamer produces a nice clean hole that is perfectly round and others say less prone to cracking; reamers also tend to leave smaller burrs so deburring seems to be minimal.

Deburring was a challenge. Most of the tools I tried for deburring the holes were too aggressive. I found what works best was a 120 degree counter sink on the end of a tapped rod. And for the skin edges, the old tried and true butterfly deburring tool works great (red handle on bench). For drilling out bad rivets, the drill press was invaluable. I can lock the piece down to the table and use an end mill to knock off the head. It turns out the heads of a squeezed rivet are pretty hard and it is easy to bugger the flight piece if not careful. All the more reason to make the rivets right the first time, quality is never having to say rework. I also made a holder for the clecos. This was suggested by a mechanic friend and was a great idea.

I thought I would get away without having a belt sander, then I realize the reinforcing strips of the practice kit didn't fit without heavy mods. I tried to trim with snips and files, but was not happy with the results, so I broke down and bought a belt sander and added it to my lazy Susan in the background. What a difference. I also tried to rivet with the DRDT2 in the foreground and that was hopeless; there was no way to secure the part and operate the handle while keeping everything aligned. My best rivets were with the Cleveland Main Squeeze shown in the corner of the bench; what a nice tool. I used the close edge dimpling tool attached to the bench in the corner with the rivet gun to dimple the ribs; this was noisy and brutal. The results were good, but it is still too out of control for my liking. So next time I will either use the Main Squeeze or I will make a top guide for the rivet tool to keep everything lined up. The less I rely on my holding things straight, the better the results seem to be. Jigs are our friends.

Also, having the work well secured seems to make it much easier to add a little English to the tools to keep everything lined up as the rivets are formed.

I feel confident that the skills I have tested on this kit are good enough for real parts. Next up this weekend is the riveting the skins to the spars and completing the practice kit, and then having my mechanic friends review and critique.

So I am making progress. Who needs sleep, there is plenty of time to sleep when I am not building.

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John S

WARNING! Information presented in this post is my opinion. All users of info have sole responsibility for determining accuracy or suitability for thier use.

Extra dues paid 2017, worth every penny

RV9A- Status: tail feathers done less tips
Wings 50%
www.pilotjohnsrv9.blogspot.com

Last edited by PilotjohnS : 08-26-2016 at 10:01 PM.
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  #15  
Old 09-09-2016, 09:38 PM
PilotjohnS PilotjohnS is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 235
Default Horizontal Stab Progress

This weeks progress has been the first half of the first page of the instructions. I have decided not to count hours; I don't really want to know. So if anybody asks, the answer is 1/2 a page :-) And I will be done on Tuesday. I figure counting hours would be like these credit card mileage plans; they are a scam to get one to buy more stuff one didn't know one needed.


So all ribs and spars for Horizontal stab will be done tomorrow. I am looking forward to the first flight rivet in two weeks, I figure.


I originally tried the butterfly deburring tool on the ribs, but this didn't work. I tried a scotch bright wheel, and this seemed similar to using a die grinder to trim fingernails.


What I settled on was 1/4" strips of 320 grit sandpaper with the part clamped loosely into a plastic hobby vise. It might take a little longer than the scotch-brite wheel, but I think it will feel a whole lot better when I am 3 miles up.


The spars were a challenge not so much because they were hard, but because they take careful work. Here precision seems to pay off.


I still haven't decide to prime or not, but am leaning towards primingand painting rear spar white to match the elevator hinge brackets, and then priming all faying surfaces using with rattle can primer and paint.


Steady progress is my goal.
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Thank you
John S

WARNING! Information presented in this post is my opinion. All users of info have sole responsibility for determining accuracy or suitability for thier use.

Extra dues paid 2017, worth every penny

RV9A- Status: tail feathers done less tips
Wings 50%
www.pilotjohnsrv9.blogspot.com

Last edited by PilotjohnS : 10-11-2016 at 03:13 PM.
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  #16  
Old 10-11-2016, 03:07 PM
PilotjohnS PilotjohnS is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 235
Default Primer Woes

As I complete the horizontal stab dimpling and prepping for assembly, I was hit with the infamous primer plaque.

My plan was to use rattle can primer on the horizontal stabilizer because there are holes in the rear spar and water can get in when parked. Since primer is not required, I figure simple rattle can would be adequate without the hassle of the two part stuff. Boy was I wrong. The rattle can went on fine and hardened up Ok after a week, but any hint of a chemical nearby and it curled up and was useless.

In addition, when priming the spars, a few drops of sweat got under the primer and got trapped there. Of course this will stay forever since the primer seals out, and seals in, moisture. Come to find out this leads to corrision problems. So I had to go over the spars and remove the primer where moisture got trapped. Then during touch up, the old primer reacted and a mess was made. I was able to get the front spars acceptable, but the rear spars required stripping the primer off completely.

For the priming, I think the only way to go is two part primer. The factory recommended sherwin Williams s60g2 was out of stock. I plan to reprime the rear spars with this two part primer. It is more work, but the rear spar seems to be the most exposed to the elements.
Lesson learned: learn from others, do what others have had success with. In this case two part primer

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Thank you
John S

WARNING! Information presented in this post is my opinion. All users of info have sole responsibility for determining accuracy or suitability for thier use.

Extra dues paid 2017, worth every penny

RV9A- Status: tail feathers done less tips
Wings 50%
www.pilotjohnsrv9.blogspot.com

Last edited by PilotjohnS : 10-11-2016 at 06:43 PM.
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  #17  
Old 10-11-2016, 03:13 PM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 3,088
Default

You're doing the right thing by not counting hours. I am and it hasn't been making me happy.

Dave,
RV-3B, now on the fuselage
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  #18  
Old 10-11-2016, 03:15 PM
PilotjohnS PilotjohnS is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 235
Default I am convinced

I am convinced either everyone is bad at math or I am just really slow
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Thank you
John S

WARNING! Information presented in this post is my opinion. All users of info have sole responsibility for determining accuracy or suitability for thier use.

Extra dues paid 2017, worth every penny

RV9A- Status: tail feathers done less tips
Wings 50%
www.pilotjohnsrv9.blogspot.com

Last edited by PilotjohnS : 10-11-2016 at 06:43 PM.
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  #19  
Old 10-11-2016, 06:42 PM
PilotjohnS PilotjohnS is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 235
Default First Rivets

Let the flaming begin!

I managed to get my first part riveted together. This is the horizontal stabilizer's front spar. I felt it came out pretty good.

So I am not counting hours, but this took me 6 weeks to get here, I originally figured 2 weeks. So my concept of schedule is a little off. Maybe I WILL buy that quick build fuse.
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Thank you
John S

WARNING! Information presented in this post is my opinion. All users of info have sole responsibility for determining accuracy or suitability for thier use.

Extra dues paid 2017, worth every penny

RV9A- Status: tail feathers done less tips
Wings 50%
www.pilotjohnsrv9.blogspot.com
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  #20  
Old 10-12-2016, 10:27 AM
sbal0906's Avatar
sbal0906 sbal0906 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Posts: 189
Default DRDT2 just for dimpling

I may have misread one of your earlier posts, but it sounded like you were trying to set rivets with the DRDT2? I have the DRDT2 and it's great for dimpling but as I understand, is not meant for setting rivets.

You're making great progress! And unless there's a specific date you want to be finished by, I'd recommended not thinking about schedules and such. We always tend to underestimate how long it takes to do something. Life can bring unavoidable interruptions as well and it's easy to start feeling bummed that you didn't get as far as you'd like. I started in 2012 and am only now working on the elevators. Just keep at it and you'll get there.

Cheers!
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Working on empennage but the wing kit has been received.
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