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  #11  
Old 04-07-2015, 08:30 PM
togaflyer togaflyer is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Cleveland Ga
Posts: 382
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Another product option:

TECHNICAL DATA
PR-1425 Class B Windshield And Canopy Sealant
Description
PR-1425 Class B is an aircraft windshield and canopy sealant. It has a service temperature range from -65°F (-54°C) to 250°F (121°C), with intermittent excursions up to 275°F (135°C). This material is designed for fillet sealing of properly prepared glass, polycarbonate, acrylic and other aircraft sealing appli- cations. This product is specifically formulated not to craze substrates. The cured sealant exhibits excellent resistance to UV and weather exposure.
PR-1425 Class B is a two-part, dichromate cured poly- sulfide compound. The uncured material is a low sag, thixotropic paste, suitable for application by extrusion gun or spatula. This sealant has excellent adhesion to common aircraft substrates.
The following tests are in accordance with PRC- DeSoto International and other OEM specification test methods.
Application Properties (Typical)
Performance Properties (Typical)
Cured 7 days @ 77°F (25°C), 50% RH
Cured specific gravity 1.49
Nonvolatile content, % 93
Ultimate cure hardness,
Durometer A 55
Peel strength, pli (N/25 mm), 100% cohesion Dry, 14 days at 77°F (25°C)
Color Part A
Part B Mixed
Mixing ratio By weight
Base viscosity
(Brookfield #7 @ 2 rpm), Poise (Pa-s)
Black Black Black
Part A:Part B 10:100
16,000 (1600)
*Primed with PR-142 Adhesion Promoter
Thermal rupture resistance - Retains pressure of 10 psi with only negligible deformation, both before and after immersion in JRF.
Low temperature flexibility @ -65°F (-54°C) - No cracking, checking or loss of adhesion.
Corrosion resistance - No corrosion, adhesion loss, softening, or blistering after 20-day immersion in 2- layer salt water/JRF @ 140°F (60°C).
Resistance to fluids - Excellent resistance to water, alcohols, petroleum-base and synthetic lubricating oils, and petroleum-base hydraulic fluids.
Flexibility - No cracks after bending 180 degrees over 0.125 inch (3.18 mm) mandrel.
Repairability to itself - Excellent to both freshly cured as well as fuel aged and abraded fillets.
Fungus resistance Non-nutrient
Note: The application and performance property val- ues above are typical for the material, but not intend- ed for use in specifications or for acceptance inspec- tion criteria because of variations in testing methods, conditions and configurations.
Slump, inches (mm) Initial
B-1/2 0.20 (5.08)
B-1 0.15 (3.81)
B-2 0.20 (5.08)
50 Minutes 90 Minutes —— ——
—— ——
0.25 (6.35) 0.25 (6.35)
MIL-G-25667 (Glass)
MIL-P-8184 (Acrylic)* MIL-P-83310 (Polycarbonate)* MIL-S-5059 (Stainless steel)* AMS-T-9046 (Titanium comp. C)* AMS-QQ-A-250/12 (Aluminum)
50 (222) 48 (214) 46 (205) 46 (205) 46 (205) 46 (205)
Application life and cure time @ 77°F (25°C), 50% RH
Cure time
Application Tack free
life time Durometer (hours) (hours) (hours)
B-1/2 1/2 <8
B-1 1 <24
B-2 2 <24
24 48 48
to 30 A
Where Smart Solutions Take Flight®
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  #12  
Old 06-12-2017, 10:02 PM
Kyle Boatright Kyle Boatright is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 2,934
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Many people fiberglass their windows into the top. If you're gonna do that, why not glue the windows in with something user friendly like Lexcel (a hardware store product for plexi and lexan) or Proseal?

With the fiberglass capturing the plexi, what's the benefit of a specialty adhesive?
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2001 RV-6 N46KB
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  #13  
Old 06-12-2017, 10:53 PM
mciaglia mciaglia is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 79
Default Other method

As I embark on the fuselage kit I know the windows are not far off. The little research I have done has lead me to consider the silpruf method done by glastar for their windows. The 5 part series on YouTube details the installation process. Why has no one thought of molding a fairing for the windshield that can be riveted/glassed into place and do all the transperiencies with this method...including the windshield? I think it would be interesting to create a fairing that attaches to the upper forward fuselage that already has a curve in it. Light glass work to blend it in. It would also have a relief for the windshield to be cut to fit into place.

1.) It would crest a uniform look.
2.) pretty much avoids the cracking worry
3.) allows for window installation at anytime even after exterior paint
4.) if there is a window crack it's easily removed and replaced
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Houston, TX
Donating Monthly since 10/17
N189PT- Christen Eagle II
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  #14  
Old 06-13-2017, 06:46 AM
rleffler's Avatar
rleffler rleffler is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Delaware, OH (KDLZ)
Posts: 3,693
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Boatright View Post
Many people fiberglass their windows into the top. If you're gonna do that, why not glue the windows in with something user friendly like Lexcel (a hardware store product for plexi and lexan) or Proseal?

With the fiberglass capturing the plexi, what's the benefit of a specialty adhesive?
The glass on the windows is cosmetic to cover the transition between the window and canopy cover. Traditionally, the materials expand at different rates causing the paint to crack. The glass isn't doing anything to hold the window in place.

There already has been once incident in which a rear window has departed the aircraft in flight. I don't recall what adhesive was used, but I'm sure that the thread is still in the archives if somebody wants to search for it.

I used Lord adhesive. I've been very happy with it and there has been no cracks after five years. I don't recall the product number of the adhesive, but Geoff @ Aerosport Products sells it.
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  #15  
Old 06-13-2017, 06:50 AM
rleffler's Avatar
rleffler rleffler is offline
 
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Location: Delaware, OH (KDLZ)
Posts: 3,693
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mciaglia View Post
As I embark on the fuselage kit I know the windows are not far off. The little research I have done has lead me to consider the silpruf method done by glastar for their windows. The 5 part series on YouTube details the installation process. Why has no one thought of molding a fairing for the windshield that can be riveted/glassed into place and do all the transperiencies with this method...including the windshield? I think it would be interesting to create a fairing that attaches to the upper forward fuselage that already has a curve in it. Light glass work to blend it in. It would also have a relief for the windshield to be cut to fit into place.

1.) It would crest a uniform look.
2.) pretty much avoids the cracking worry
3.) allows for window installation at anytime even after exterior paint
4.) if there is a window crack it's easily removed and replaced
There have been several people that have attempted to make fairings to allow the easier re-installation of the windows. In my opinion, none of the solutions so far look at nice as the plans method. I suspect others feel the same or you would be seeing more RV-10s with them.
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  #16  
Old 06-13-2017, 08:36 AM
Bill Boyd's Avatar
Bill Boyd Bill Boyd is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Landing field "12VA"
Posts: 954
Default Already decided

I'll be doing this for the transparencies -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A336SG-fsiI

But this discussion does have me wondering about the use of Gflex instead of West 105 for the windscreen fairing.
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Hop-Along Aerodrome (12VA)
RV-6A - N30YD - flying since '98
RV-10 - N130YD reserved - under construction

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  #17  
Old 06-13-2017, 09:28 AM
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NovaBandit NovaBandit is offline
 
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Location: Hastings, MN
Posts: 570
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Another vote for Lord. Super easy to work with, great bond, and easy to get a nice looking finished fillet.
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RV-10 N829EC - Flying
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  #18  
Old 06-13-2017, 09:58 AM
bcondrey bcondrey is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Bellevue, NE
Posts: 456
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FWIW, I've installed RV-10 windows using both Weld-on (Van's recommended) and Lord adhesive (from Aerosport Products). Adhesion with both is great however the Lord adhesive is MUCH easier to work with. Issues with the Weld-on are that it skins over very quickly so working time is short. Not really an issue for the rear windows but can be an issue on the door windows and windscreen. It also tends to get "stringy" at about the time it skins over so you better have everything well masked. Final issue is that it cures very, very hard. This makes it difficult to sand out and remove masking material that the Weld-on dried on top of. This is also likely a major contributing factor to the cracking issue many have experienced, especially if the gap between the actual window and joggle is filled with Weld-on. The Lord adhesive cures more slowly, doesn't quickly skin over, doesn't get stringy, and the fully cured product is more like epoxy than concrete (like weld-on).

My recommendation would be to use Lord adhesive.
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  #19  
Old 06-13-2017, 01:19 PM
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Janekom Janekom is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: South Africa
Posts: 698
Default Sikaflex is your friend

I am busy with RV build number 7, this my third RV 10 and have always used Sikaflex 295. Easy to work with and never had any problems.
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South Africa
AP 325, AMO 1256
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