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  #1  
Old 01-12-2019, 08:32 AM
Eagleflip Eagleflip is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Yorktown, VA
Posts: 37
Default Fix or Replace Cowling?

Hi--

I did a search and did not find a thread on this topic, so here I go...

My a/c partner and I did not build our 6A (I am in awe of you guys!), so we don't have as many repair skills you do. Our plane has about 1400 hours total time.

The upper and lower cowl seem to generate cracks at a rapid rate, e.g. we have to get the fiberglass repaired and painted about once a year, which equates to about 170 hours of flight time between repairs. Crack locations vary a little, but normally they develop around the rounded corners of lower air intake/vent (I would call it the "scoop", but I'm an admitted newb).

My questions are simple.

Is the current repair cycle normal?
Should we consider replacing the cowlings and starting over?
If so, I do not see RV 6 specific cowlings on the parts list...is it a common part with another model?
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  #2  
Old 01-12-2019, 08:40 AM
Kyle Boatright Kyle Boatright is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 3,455
Default

That isn't normal.

A few pictures would help. Maybe the scoop wasn't properly attached (it was a separate piece back in the day). It was supposed to be attached and then layers of fiberglass were laid over the transitions - maybe that wasn't done. Maybe something is vibrating against it.

In any case, a better understanding of the location of the cracks would help.

My immediate thoughts are that a proper repair should be much easier than fitting a new cowl and that, properly done (and with any causal factors eliminated), you should never have to repair that part of the cowl again.
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Atlanta, GA
2001 RV-6 N46KB
2019(?) RV-10

Last edited by Kyle Boatright : 01-12-2019 at 09:38 AM.
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  #3  
Old 01-12-2019, 08:44 AM
BillL BillL is online now
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central IL
Posts: 4,638
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Boatright View Post
That isn't normal.

A few pictures would help. Maybe the scoop wasn't properly attached (it was a separate piece back in the day). It was supposed to be attached and then layers of fiberglass were laid over the transitions - maybe that wasn't done. Maybe something is vibrating against it.

In any case, a better understanding of the location of the cracks would help.

My immediate thoughts are that a proper repair should be much easier than fitting a new cowl and that, properly done (and with any mitigating factors eliminated), you should never have to repair that part of the cowl again.
+1 .
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RV-7
1st Flight 1-27-18
Phase II 8-3-18
Repairman 11-15-18
Instrument Currency 12-17-18
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  #4  
Old 01-12-2019, 08:47 AM
Mel's Avatar
Mel Mel is online now
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Dallas area
Posts: 10,190
Default Not Normal....

Before you repair it again, try and find what's causing the cracks. Possibly the transition from cowling to carb inlet is too short allowing the engine vibration to exert pressure on the cowling.
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Mel Asberry..DAR since last century
A&P/EAA Tech Counselor/Flight Advisor/Nat'l Test Pilot School
Specializing in Amateur-Built and Light-Sport Aircraft
<rvmel(at)icloud.com>
North Texas (8TA5)
RV-6 Flying since 1993, 172hp O-320, 3-Blade Catto (since 2003)
Legend Cub purchased 12/2017
FRIEND of the RV-1
Eagle's Nest Mentor
Recipient of Wright Brothers "Master Pilot" Award
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