VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

- POSTING RULES
- Donate yearly (please).
- Advertise in here!

- Today's Posts | Insert Pics


Go Back   VAF Forums > Avionics / Interiors / Fiberglass > ADS-B
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-06-2019, 08:41 PM
donaziza's Avatar
donaziza donaziza is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 627
Default Lotta questions on ADS B Privacy here on VAF--lately

ADS-B PRIVACY INCHES FORWARD
ANONYMOUS MODE ALLOWED FOR VFR FLIGHT PLANS
August 1, 2019 By Mike Collins
An AOPA petition to expand pilots’ ability to use certain Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Out equipment in anonymous mode has resulted in the FAA clarifying that what AOPA sought actually is what the agency intended when it wrote the ADS-B requirements.

The Federal Aviation Administration is one of the many government agencies that have influence over general aviation. Photo by David Tulis.
The Federal Aviation Administration is one of the many government agencies that have influence over general aviation. Photo by David Tulis.
In November 2018, Rune Duke, AOPA senior director of airspace and air traffic, petitioned the FAA for an exemption from 14 CFR 91.227(d)(8) and (11). He asked that pilots of aircraft equipped with 978 MHz Universal Access Transceiver (UAT) ADS-B systems be allowed to operate utilizing their UATs’ anonymous mode when (1) the pilot has filed a VFR flight plan; (2) the pilot has not requested air traffic control services; and (3) the operation is outside of 14 CFR 91.225 ADS-B rule airspace. This was because Paragraph 4-5-7(c)(3) of the Aeronautical Information Manual states that a UAT’s anonymous mode can only be used “when the operator has not filed a flight plan and is not requesting ATC services”—excluding aircraft on VFR flight plans, he said.

A UAT is one of the two ADS-B datalink technologies established by the FAA in the United States, where the agency will require ADS-B Out for flights after Jan. 1, 2020, generally in airspace where a transponder is required today (the other is the 1090 MHz Mode S Extended Squitter transponder). In the anonymous mode, a UAT creates a randomized address that does not match the actual, unique International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) code assigned to that aircraft, protecting the privacy of the aircraft operator. ADS-B broadcasts an aircraft’s ICAO code and call sign, which can be captured by anyone with a suitable receiver and then used to determine who owns and operates the aircraft.
AOPA had been told in June that this concern would be resolved through clarification in the Aeronautical Information Manual. “In pushing the issue we were able to achieve our goal and ensure pilots can fly on a VFR flight plan and utilize anonymous mode, while also ensuring this capability is available in rule airspace,” Duke said. “I was told by air traffic that the petition request was probably the fastest path to an answer, as legal interpretations must go through several levels of external oversight right now and are delayed. I am happy to see that we were able to get a good answer for pilots.”

The FAA response noted that a pilot conducting a VFR operation may file a VFR flight plan to obtain search and rescue protection. “When a pilot files a VFR flight plan, he or she does not receive ATC services unless he or she requests flight following. Therefore, a pilot conducting a VFR operation may file a VFR flight plan without requesting ATC services…. It appears that the FAA intended to allow persons conducting VFR operations, including those on a VFR flight plan, to use the anonymity mode so long as they did not request ATC services (i.e., flight following).”

The AIM provisions clarifying UAT anonymous mode operations will be published on Jan. 30, 2020. The FAA also noted that it will consider revising 14 CFR 91.227(d)(8) and (11) in the future to eliminate any confusion regarding whether anonymous mode can be used while on a VFR flight plan.

1090ES privacy
Privacy options are moving more slowly for aircraft equipped with 1090 MHz Extended Squitter for ADS-B Out. AOPA has been actively engaged in collaborative conversations with the FAA, the National Business Aviation Association, and other industry partners to find an anonymity solution for operators using 1090 MHz ADS-B systems, as well as those utilizing air traffic services, Duke said. The FAA has proposed a concept called “rolling ICAO codes,” in which a participating aircraft would emit randomly assigned ICAO codes that are periodically changed; combined with an anonymous call sign, aircraft would be harder to track. The idea has also been called “private ICAO addresses.”

“This is a promising approach to increasing anonymity for general aviation operators, but we are still waiting for the FAA to take the necessary steps to begin a demonstration effort,” he said.

The next step in the process is for the FAA to publish a request for proposals from the third-party providers that would be involved—but this has not happened, he added. “I understand we can expect an update at the next Equip 2020 meeting on Sept. 11. However, the FAA can't give us much of a timeline, as they are still conducting internal reviews,” Duke said.

“Work must be expedited on the long-term solution: encryption of ADS-B data,” he added. “It is understood that to facilitate privacy, anonymity must be initiated at the source—the aircraft—as the many privately operated ground receiver networks do not rely on an FAA data stream to feed their tracking websites. Encryption at the source will allow an automated solution that will reduce the workload for operators and the agency, and this solution could become a global standard.”
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-06-2019, 08:56 PM
roadrunner20's Avatar
roadrunner20 roadrunner20 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bay Pines, FL (based @ KCLW)
Posts: 1,906
Default

To clarify & correct me if I'm wrong...

The FAA still receives your aircraft ICAO in the ADS-B OUT datastream.
They know who you are, but the rebroadcast transmits a randomly assigned ICAO & anonymous tail# to protect your privacy from other aircraft that are receiving ADS-B IN.
__________________
Danny "RoadRunner" Landry
Morphed RV7(formally 7A), N20DL, PnP Pilot
1135+ hours
2019 Donation Paid

Last edited by roadrunner20 : 08-06-2019 at 08:58 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-06-2019, 09:33 PM
jwyatt jwyatt is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Goodhue, MN
Posts: 155
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by roadrunner20 View Post
They know who you are, but the rebroadcast transmits a randomly assigned ICAO & anonymous tail# to protect your privacy from other aircraft that are receiving ADS-B IN.
I hope they use an obvious anonymous tail number (N1ANON, etc) if this is the case, rather than randomizing it. When using the received data for traffic identification purposes, I’d rather know it’s being anonymized - or not see it at all as is currently the case with TIS-B targets - than see one normal-looking tail number while hearing a different one on the radio. Seems it would leave people always wondering where that mystery target is.
__________________
Joshua Wyatt | Goodhue, Minn.
RV-9A N627DW @ KRGK - Flying since 2012
AFS 4500s | SDS EM-5
rv9a.pacificrimsound.com
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-06-2019, 09:41 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Livermore, CA
Posts: 5,863
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by roadrunner20 View Post
To clarify & correct me if I'm wrong...

The FAA still receives your aircraft ICAO in the ADS-B OUT datastream.
They know who you are, but the rebroadcast transmits a randomly assigned ICAO & anonymous tail# to protect your privacy from other aircraft that are receiving ADS-B IN.
No that’s not how it works. The ADSB-out from an anonymous UAT is randomized at the source, not in a rebroadcast. Otherwise pilots receiving adsb-in both directly and from a ground station would mistakenly think there were two airplanes.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-06-2019, 09:42 PM
roadrunner20's Avatar
roadrunner20 roadrunner20 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bay Pines, FL (based @ KCLW)
Posts: 1,906
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jwyatt View Post
I hope they use an obvious anonymous tail number (N1ANON, etc) if this is the case, rather than randomizing it. When using the received data for traffic identification purposes, I’d rather know it’s being anonymized - or not see it at all as is currently the case with TIS-B targets - than see one normal-looking tail number while hearing a different one on the radio. Seems it would leave people always wondering where that mystery target is.
I agree. I see some anonymous reported as NONE, or is empty
__________________
Danny "RoadRunner" Landry
Morphed RV7(formally 7A), N20DL, PnP Pilot
1135+ hours
2019 Donation Paid
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-06-2019, 09:43 PM
roadrunner20's Avatar
roadrunner20 roadrunner20 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bay Pines, FL (based @ KCLW)
Posts: 1,906
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
No that’s not how it works. The ADSB-out from an anonymous UAT is randomized at the source, not in a rebroadcast. Otherwise pilots receiving adsb-in both directly and from a ground station would mistakenly think there were two airplanes.
Yep. Makes sense.
__________________
Danny "RoadRunner" Landry
Morphed RV7(formally 7A), N20DL, PnP Pilot
1135+ hours
2019 Donation Paid
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-07-2019, 07:04 AM
DanH's Avatar
DanH DanH is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: 08A
Posts: 8,755
Default

The popular Garmin GDL-82 broadcasts the aircraft's real ICAO code and N-number at start-up, for about 4 seconds. It then switches to a random ICAO code and drops the N-number, eventually replacing the N-number with "VFR".

There are variations between ADS-B manufacturers, but all seem to follow the general pattern of NOT being anonymous at start, meaning anyone with a receiver can log the real ICAO code, the location, and the new code, meaning the aircraft is easily identified.

I'm told it can be corrected with a software change. Given the manufacturer advertised "anonymous", I bought "anonymous", and it's not actually "anonymous", I'd like to think my favorite vendor will field the update.

Example startup log here:

http://www.vansairforce.com/communit...&postcount=155
__________________
Dan Horton
RV-8 SS
Barrett IO-390

Last edited by DanH : 08-07-2019 at 07:07 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-07-2019, 07:40 AM
Snowflake's Avatar
Snowflake Snowflake is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Posts: 3,466
Default

Regardless of all the anonymizing, if you're operating from/to a controlled airport you'll be given a discrete code on first ATC contact and that will de-anonymize your entire flight even if you were anonymous on arrival or switch to anonymous once you're outside the zone on departure.
__________________
Rob Prior
1996 RV-6 "Tweety" C-FRBP (formerly N196RV)
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-07-2019, 07:45 AM
Steve Iacoviello Steve Iacoviello is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: The Woodlands, TX
Posts: 26
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanH View Post
The popular Garmin GDL-82 broadcasts the aircraft's real ICAO code and N-number at start-up, for about 4 seconds. It then switches to a random ICAO code and drops the N-number, eventually replacing the N-number with "VFR".

There are variations between ADS-B manufacturers, but all seem to follow the general pattern of NOT being anonymous at start, meaning anyone with a receiver can log the real ICAO code, the location, and the new code, meaning the aircraft is easily identified.

I'm told it can be corrected with a software change. Given the manufacturer advertised "anonymous", I bought "anonymous", and it's not actually "anonymous", I'd like to think my favorite vendor will field the update.

Example startup log here:

http://www.vansairforce.com/communit...&postcount=155
Dan,
From a practical perspective how far away can an ADSB receiver read your ICAO and location when you start outside your hangar during that four seconds? If it is only a few hundred yards one can also read your tail # as you taxi by. But if the range is further you have a point. I have a GDL-82 installed and I agree that the option to be completely anonymous would be good but I also suspect that no one is receiving and recording my startup. Now when the tower insists on assigning a squawk when I return there goes my anonymity.
Steve
__________________
RV-9A completed 12/2011
N579S
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-07-2019, 07:52 AM
airguy's Avatar
airguy airguy is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Garden City, Tx
Posts: 4,704
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Iacoviello View Post
Dan,
From a practical perspective how far away can an ADSB receiver read your ICAO and location when you start outside your hangar during that four seconds? If it is only a few hundred yards one can also read your tail # as you taxi by. But if the range is further you have a point. I have a GDL-82 installed and I agree that the option to be completely anonymous would be good but I also suspect that no one is receiving and recording my startup. Now when the tower insists on assigning a squawk when I return there goes my anonymity.
Steve
Arguably QUITE far away... https://aireon.com/
__________________
Greg Niehues - PPSEL, IFR, Repairman Cert.
Garden City, TX VAF 2019 dues paid
N16GN flying 450 hrs and counting! Built an off-plan 9A with too much fuel and too much HP. Should drop dead any minute now.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:35 AM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.