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  #41  
Old 12-15-2009, 07:02 AM
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N8RV N8RV is offline
 
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Location: Elkhart, Indiana
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Default

I removed the oil cooler and shutter, then moved the shutter to the front of the cooler. Like others said, cranking down the bolts only causes the shutter to bind, so I had to back off the bolts a bit.

The biggest problem I've found so far is that the cables that I've used are too freakin' flimsy to operate the shutter from the cockpit. All of them have wrapped-wire housings that flex way too much and won't allow movement of the shutter reliably.

I ended up mounting the control just inside the oil access door temporarily and running the cable housing through a piece of aluminum tubing. Worked great.

So, the plan is to either buy a new lightweight cable and run it through tubing all the way to the shutter or find a heavier-weight control cable. It's turning into a bigger engineering issue than I had expected!

BTW, I have not flown it since moving the shutter, so I have no idea if it will even work. I'll report back when the weather cooperates enough to fly ...
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  #42  
Old 12-15-2009, 07:54 AM
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L.Adamson L.Adamson is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: KSLC
Posts: 4,021
Default You need the spacing washers

Quote:
Originally Posted by N8RV View Post
I removed the oil cooler and shutter, then moved the shutter to the front of the cooler. Like others said, cranking down the bolts only causes the shutter to bind, so I had to back off the bolts a bit.

The biggest problem I've found so far is that the cables that I've used are too freakin' flimsy to operate the shutter from the cockpit. All of them have wrapped-wire housings that flex way too much and won't allow movement of the shutter reliably.

I ended up mounting the control just inside the oil access door temporarily and running the cable housing through a piece of aluminum tubing. Worked great.

So, the plan is to either buy a new lightweight cable and run it through tubing all the way to the shutter or find a heavier-weight control cable. It's turning into a bigger engineering issue than I had expected!

BTW, I have not flown it since moving the shutter, so I have no idea if it will even work. I'll report back when the weather cooperates enough to fly ...
A few items here...., as I went through the exact same problems.

Put a washer or two between the shutter & oil cooler. This will totally free up the shutter. I used a standard thickness washer on each side of the shutter, and filled in the gaps with a weather seal that I tested with a hot heat gun. The flange on the oil cooler does not have enough clearance to prevent the fins from pressing against the shutter, without a washer to space it. With the washer, you can fully torque the bolt to specs. I did have to get some new bolts that were a quarter inch longer.

My cable is also the cheapest light weight that Autozone had. Around $7.00
At first, it would only bind. With the washers installed, the cable now freely works. It runs to the panel on the bottom left side, with a couple of plastic wire wraps to support it, until I have the urge to dive under the panel. It's also supported near the shutter, and a swivel fitting through the firewall. I too, spent several additional days on this project. The cooler & shutter came off quite a few times.

L.Adamson --- RV6A
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  #43  
Old 01-04-2010, 01:54 PM
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N8RV N8RV is offline
 
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Location: Elkhart, Indiana
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Default Update

I had the rare opportunity to fly last weekend during a break in the snow and permacloud around here. OAT was around 20*F. After about 1.5 hrs of flying around at cruise settings with the oil cooler shutter closed completely, the oil temp still wouldn't climb above 150*.

I guess my question now is this: If I can't get temps above 150 in the winter, is it actually harder on the engine to fly around with cold oil than not flying it at all?

My only other solution now is to tape off the rear of the cooler as well and see if that allows the oil temp to rise. What do you guys who live up in WI, MI, MN, etc., do in the winter? Just not fly?
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Peoria, AZ

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  #44  
Old 02-01-2010, 01:38 PM
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N8RV N8RV is offline
 
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Location: Elkhart, Indiana
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Default New approach to try ...

I have a new approach to this shutter control issue. On another thread, it was suggested to use a servo to control a retractable landing light. Well, a light went off in my head -- use a servo to control the oil cooler shutter ELECTRONICALLY instead of mechanically.

I have an extra Ray Allen servo and associated hardware in the hangar. If I mount the servo on a bracket by the shutter and make a controll arm to the shutter, I can then mount a rocker switch in the cockpit, run some wires and >voile'< problem solved!

I'll let everyone know if it works ...
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  #45  
Old 02-01-2010, 01:57 PM
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JonJay JonJay is offline
 
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Default Make sure it can take the heat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by N8RV View Post
I have a new approach to this shutter control issue. On another thread, it was suggested to use a servo to control a retractable landing light. Well, a light went off in my head -- use a servo to control the oil cooler shutter ELECTRONICALLY instead of mechanically.

I have an extra Ray Allen servo and associated hardware in the hangar. If I mount the servo on a bracket by the shutter and make a controll arm to the shutter, I can then mount a rocker switch in the cockpit, run some wires and >voile'< problem solved!

I'll let everyone know if it works ...
It gets hot in there.
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  #46  
Old 02-01-2010, 02:20 PM
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N8RV N8RV is offline
 
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonJay View Post
It gets hot in there.
Even though it's on the "cold" side of the baffling, are you thinking that it's too hot for a servo, Jon? I hadn't thought of that ...

Guess I'll never know unless I try. I have nothing to lose ...
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Peoria, AZ

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  #47  
Old 02-01-2010, 02:31 PM
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B Cunningham B Cunningham is offline
 
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Location: Louisville, KY
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Default Ray Allen says:

From the website:

Can I use a RAC servo inside the engine cowling?

We know of our servos that are used successfully inside cowlings, but we are hesitant to recommend it. Although the DuPont MinlonŽ brand nylon we use is the same basic type that is used in BMW valve covers, the strength of the gears inside get weaker as temperatures climb above 180 degrees F. Try to keep the servo in a ventilated location under the cowl away from exhaust pipes or better yet, behind the firewall. If your heart is set on using them for cowl flaps, remember that cowl flaps take a terrific air load beating so keep them as small as possible.
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  #48  
Old 02-01-2010, 02:45 PM
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MSFT-1 MSFT-1 is offline
 
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Default I have one of the NonStop Aviation butterfly valves

in my RV-10. Actually just got done installing it last week.

Some observations:

1) Very well made.
2) Ridiculously easy to install (30 minutes or less)
3) Uses a standard ACS 740 cable to move the valve from within the cockpit.
4) Works as advertised.

The only negative I found with it was this:

The manufacturer uses a small pop rivet as a stop for the butterfly valve to hit when it is fully closed. The problem is the rivet is too small and the valve can actually get stuck on the rivet.

After installing it, I went out and flew the plane for several circuits in the pattern and found that by closing the valve about half way I could easily raise the temperature of the oil from 155F to 175F (pretty cold day). I then closed the door all the way and found that it was "stuck". Not a big problem since in the five minutes it took to land the tempature only went up another 2 or 3 degrees.

I took the cowling off and could see that when i closed the valve all the way the valve was stuck on the rivet. The easy fix was to drill out the rivet and replace it with a machine screw and a castle nut that sticks down further.

So, overall I am impressed with the unit and am very happy with my purchase. Nothing against the more complicated designs including electronic ones, but this is a solution that begs for a nice simple design.

Oh, one more thing. The NonStop Aviation unit comes with everything you need except one 4" hose clamp.
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  #49  
Old 02-01-2010, 03:06 PM
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N8RV N8RV is offline
 
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Location: Elkhart, Indiana
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by B Cunningham View Post
From the website:

Can I use a RAC servo inside the engine cowling?

We know of our servos that are used successfully inside cowlings, but we are hesitant to recommend it. Although the DuPont MinlonŽ brand nylon we use is the same basic type that is used in BMW valve covers, the strength of the gears inside get weaker as temperatures climb above 180 degrees F. Try to keep the servo in a ventilated location under the cowl away from exhaust pipes or better yet, behind the firewall. If your heart is set on using them for cowl flaps, remember that cowl flaps take a terrific air load beating so keep them as small as possible.
Good info to know, thanks. Hmmm ... (thinking out loud ) ... maybe a blast tube like is used to keep mags cool? Easy to do, right next to the oil cooler opening. Might be worth consideration.

Of course, then I might need to rig up a shutter for the blast tube, so that the servo didn't get too cold ...
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Peoria, AZ

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  #50  
Old 02-01-2010, 05:11 PM
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Location: Lake Country, B.C. Canada
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Default mechanical marvel-ing

...hey guys, one last time.

If the vernatherm doesn't open 'til the engine oil 'needs' it to, how is the cooler 'over-cooling' our oil so much? the hot oil should just stay happily in the block all winter, right?
( and I thought I hated electronic stuff!)

sorry, I just don't get it.........but yes, I too do the oil cooler dance; cover, uncover, tape, block, plate, rinse, repeat.
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